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#1846 Indy

Indy

    the secret chord

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Posted 21 March 2017 - 00:34:54

Chuck Berry by Marc Ribot (iz intervjua Paula Olsena sa Marcom Ribotom za All About Jazz)

 

AAJ: You've played with a lot of remarkable musicians. But I'm not going to ask you about John Zorn or Tom Waits, great though they are. I want you to tell me about your experience in one of Chuck Berry's pickup bands.

 

MR: [Laughing] Okay, good call. I was in a band called the Realtones, and we were called a number of times—I don't know, five, six—to back up Chuck Berry when he came to town. I was very honored and nervous because Chuck Berry has a reputation—you know, he gets a lot of, I guess, not-great pickup bands. He leaves it to the local promoter to set up a pickup band, and usually, promoters being what promoters are, they try to save themselves a little bread [laughing]. We took it very seriously; the horn players learned the horn lines, we learned the parts.

There's a reductionist idea that Chuck Berry is this one riff. But in fact, each part is composed; each tune differs in terms of its guitar part, in terms of feel, in terms of a lot of things. It's all about the specifics. Run 'em together and you've got to take it seriously as composition. Chuck Berry's a great guitarist; he has this thing, this absolute rhythmic authority. His solos are magnetic. You can look out at the audience and as he plays a note, you almost see a ripple go out through them. It's really something to see from the stage. He's a great player who invented a lot of what we do.

Having said that, to be the second guitarist when Chuck Berry's the guitarist can be a difficult role. I suspect that a lot of guitarists who jam with Chuck Berry fall into two mistakes. One is that you need to pay tribute without doing an insulting form of imitation and mimicry. He's Chuck Berry, you're not. He doesn't need to hear you play like him. On the other hand, it's his gig and it would be stupid to be on stage with Chuck Berry without giving a nod to the fact that I, and almost every other electric guitarist who ever played rock, have taken a lot from what he does!

The second thing is that I suspect some people don't get it and say, "well, Chuck Berry, he's great but he probably doesn't practice that much. I'm going to cut him. He does his thing, but I'm going to play reallygood. That's dumb. Playing faster than Chuck Berry will not mean playing better than Chuck Berry. He'll have every right to be pissed off. So I'm very proud to say that Chuck Berry liked my blues playing. I was very proud that I didn't get kicked off the stage and that he could hear what I was doing. You know, there are certain players—Chuck Berry, Arsenio Rodriguez, Grant Green—who have this absolute rhythmic authority and their every note is just the law. I don't know—they don't teach that at Berklee, that's all I can say.

:Hail: Fantastičan ulomak, Mr BM4BP.